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Posts tagged "High Asset Divorce"

How to avoid stress in a high asset divorce

When Kansas spouses decide to go their separate ways after a marriage that has lasted 10 years or more, they often encounter many challenges regarding important issues that need resolved first, such as those having to do with property division or child custody. In a high asset divorce, such issues can be quite complex, especially if one or both spouses owns a business or a diverse investment portfolio. There are several things to keep in mind to help avoid settlement problems.

Is it possible to mediate a high asset divorce?

When Kansas spouses decide their marriages are no longer viable, they often choose to go their separate ways. In a high asset divorce, property division issues may be a central focus of settlement negotiations. It is not always the case, however, that such situations must be resolved through litigation; many couples opt for mediation to achieve agreeable terms.

Seeking high asset divorce after age 50? Read this

Most Kansas residents are aware that lifestyle choices can affect their health, sometimes in good ways, others quite bad. For instance, it is well-known that cigarette smoking is closely connected to lung cancer, so those who smoke place themselves at risk for the disease. Other situations can also have a potentially negative impact on physical, mental and emotional health, including high asset divorce.

What influence might friends have toward a high asset divorce?

Many Kansas households include married couples who have close circles of friends. Such friends typically have a lot in common with them, such as average income, children or no children, as well as what types of social activities they tend to enjoy most. Many people are influenced by the actions of their peers, even in a high asset divorce.

Those contemplating high asset divorce in Kansas should know this

Kansas residents who file tax returns will want to be aware of upcoming changes in federal tax regulations. This applies most specifically to anyone contemplating filing for a high asset divorce. The changes are set to take place at the stroke of midnight as the first day of 2019 begins.  

Preparation is key to successful high asset divorce in Kansas

Most Kansas residents have experienced unexpected situations in life that prompt major lifestyle changes. For instance, sudden loss of income may cause someone to have to sell a home and relocate to an area where employment is more readily available. When unforeseen circumstances involve a high asset divorce, thorough preparation before heading into proceedings may increase the chances of obtaining a satisfactory settlement.  

Current wife not the only one concerned with high asset divorce

Hollywood fans in Kansas and throughout the nation, especially those who are women, have been following headline news regarding former movie mogul Harvey Weinstein's current legal situation. Not only has Weinstein been accused of sexual crimes by a lot of people, his current wife filed for divorce and was recently granted primary custody of their children. The high asset divorce and numerous lawsuits pertaining to the other issues have prompted his first wife to submit a special request to the court.

Factors of high asset divorce that can impact future finances

It is doubtful anyone in Kansas who has ever navigated the process would say ending a marriage is easy. Even in amicable situations, there are typically challenges that arise that require cooperation and compromise to achieve fair and agreeable settlements, especially in cases of high asset divorce. Any number of issues can impact post divorce finances, some more than others.

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