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Child custody: What about new partner introductions?

If Kansas parents decide to divorce, they undoubtedly must resolve numerous issues regarding their children before they can move on in life. Child custody is a top priority, and it often includes issues that are highly personal, such as whether it is okay to introduce a new romantic partner to the children. Parents are wise to write out clear terms ahead of time, so that there is little guesswork involved.

The rules that parents agree upon can be incorporated into the court order. For instance, maybe parents agree that they must first introduce a new partner to the other parent before allowing that individual to meet the children. Some parents insist on being present when their children meet their ex’s new partner for the first time. The bottom line is that, if it is written as part of the court order, then both parents must adhere to the terms specified.

It is helpful for children if an activity or a favorite meal is included in the first meeting with a new partner. It is natural for kids to feel shy or awkward, no matter what their ages happen to be at the time. If a younger child or a teenager does not want to carry on extensive conversation when meeting a parent’s new romantic partner after divorce, it may be best to avoid pressuring the child and save the meeting for a time when he or she feels more comfortable.

When a child custody court order exists, both parents must fully adhere to its terms. If an issue involving a new romantic partner is causing legal problems between co-parents, it is better to try to resolve the issues at hand as soon as possible, rather than allowing a problem to linger, which often winds up making matters worse. An experienced Kansas family law attorney can provide guidance and support to a concerned parent who is struggling with custody-related issues.