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Do these things to win a child custody hearing

Ending a marriage is challenging to say the least, especially when children are involved. When parents in Kansas divorce, it is not uncommon for both parents to want primary custody of the children. This can cause a vicious child custody battle to erupt. A lengthy and expensive custody battle benefits no one. Here’s how to raise the odds of winning child custody while avoiding a contentious and drawn-out child custody hearing.

Any parent who desires custody needs to show that the children benefit from being in his or her custody and also demonstrate a willingness to work with the ex-spouse. Although there may be some negative emotions lingering from the separation, keep in mind that the former spouse is also a part of the kids’ lives. Cooperation and collaboration with the other parent will show the court a willingness to do what is needed for the benefit of the children.

A hard thing to grasp about a child custody hearing is that it doesn’t matter if what is said is actually true or not, the only thing that matters is what the court believes is true. Perception is everything. A parent who is seeking custody should do everything possible to show that he or she is a loving, competent and an involved parent. Dress appropriately, arrive on time and practice proper courtroom etiquette.

Most importantly, always keep children at the forefront. Before making a decision, consider how it will affect the children and their well-being. When determining custody, judges are required to always consider the best interests of the children. It is helpful for Kansas parents to familiarize themselves with child custody laws and seek legal representation. A seasoned and knowledgeable attorney can answer questions and provide guidance throughout this confusing process.