CALL MY OFFICE
Or Nights & Weekends
Law Firm of
Kevin Stuart Cavanaugh
Accommodating, Personalized Attention
Creative Solutions To Your Specific Legal Problem
Credit Cards Accepted For Payment
You Can Reach Me Even After Business Hours

Strategies for keeping a high asset divorce amicable

No person who has ever navigated a marital breakup would say that the process is a smooth or easy one. For those in Kansas going through a high asset divorce, the process can be even more challenging and difficult. These types of separations involve the tedious and challenging task of dividing property and assets the couple has accumulated during their marriage. Here are some strategies to help create an amicable high asset divorce. 

Be honest and open 

Spouses usually begin the process of dividing marital property by taking an inventory of the property and assets they have acquired during the marriage. Always be open and honest during this process. It is not uncommon nor wrong for one spouse to have money stashed away in an individual account. However, do not try to hide it. Hiding assets is illegal and attorneys are very good at finding assets that have been hidden. 

Be civil and use professionals 

If spouses can begin the process of dividing assets in an amicable way, they can usually avert the slow and expensive process of getting the court involved. It is best if spouses communicate via their personal attorneys to come to an agreement. If separating spouses can come to an agreement, a property division agreement can be signed and a simple divorce will be granted. Reportedly, about 90% of divorces granted in the United States today are settled by using property division agreements and resolved without a trial. 

The bottom line is the better spouses can cooperate and work together, the more they both will be able to retain. Any Kansas resident who is going through a divorce could benefit by contacting a knowledgeable legal representative. A seasoned family law attorney can answer tough divorce-related questions and represent an individual’s best interests both in and out of court.